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Supreme Court to Decide on The Release of Trump’s Financial Records

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The Supreme Court had a lot to say about President Trump’s wallet. Well, it comes with big questions, like whether the president can block the release of his financial records. Yesterday, SCOTUS heard oral arguments over the phone on three Trump-related cases.

The first argument covered two cases focused on subpoenas from House investigations, which were looking into alleged crimes like whether Trump lied on his financial records to reduce his taxes. The second involved subpoenas from the Manhattan DA, who’s investigating alleged hush-money payments to women (remember Stormy Daniels?). Trump has denied wrongdoing in each case. And his defense team claimed that the House’s subpoenas are illegitimate, adding that as long as Trump is in office, he should be immune from any criminal investigation.

Some of them (hint: the liberal justices) gave a history lesson to get their point across: if President Nixon and President Clinton were forced to cooperate in their investigations, why shouldn’t Trump? Others (hint: the conservative justices) focused on whether allowing the subpoenas would lead to presidential harassment. Both sides seemed skeptical that a president can have absolute immunity.

So what’s the final ruling? There isn’t one…yet. A decision is expected within weeks. But there are a few different ways the court could rule. Justices could require Trump to hand over some financial records or none at all. They could also hand the cases back over to the lower courts – in which case a decision isn’t likely until after the November election.

The Supreme Court is weighing the powers of Congress against those of a sitting president. Whatever the court decides, this could have implications not just ahead of the November election, but for years to come.

Ash Exantus aka Ash Cash is one of the nation’s top personal finance experts. Dubbed as the Hip-Hop Financial Motivator, he uses a culturally responsive approach in teaching financial literacy. He is also a speaker, and bestselling author of six books. Ash has established himself as a thought leader and trusted voice with Corporate America, Colleges, Churches, and Community based organizations. Ash is best known for helping people maximize their full potentials by giving them the inspiration, tools, and resources needed to live their best lives. For more info on Ash please visit www.IamAshCash.com

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The Top 8 PPP Myths, Busted

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Not sure if the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) is right for you? Even as it’s extended from eight weeks to 24, there are a lot of PPP myths floating around.

Don’t let these myths stop you from getting the loan your business needs. Our partners at Bench have put together a short video busting the most common PPP myths. Check it out—you’ll be glad you did.

Here’s a summary:

PPP MYTH #1: There’s no point in applying

The PPP is definitely worth applying for. A lot of small business owners applied for the first round of PPP funding, never heard back from their banks, and gave up.

 

While it’s true that overwhelming demand has slowed down some banks’ approval processes, that doesn’t mean you should give up on PPP. In fact, it’s now easier than ever to apply.

 

The SBA is working with financial technology (fintech) companies to make PPP applications more available en masse. You can apply for PPP online through one of these companies, without ever having to leave your home. And you don’t need to worry about your application falling through the cracks.

 

If you have already applied for PPP through a bank but haven’t heard back, you can apply again through a different institution.

 

(One exception: If the bank gave you an etran number, the funds have already been committed to you. Any additional applications will be automatically rejected.)

 

Bench has made it easy to apply for PPP through popular online lender BlueVine. The Bench and BlueVine PPP page walks you through the process, complete with videos, explaining each document you need to supply.

PPP MYTH #2: Only big businesses are receiving PPP loans

Small businesses qualify for PPP every day.

 

Early during the first round of funding, application requirements changed frequently, and small businesses were struggling to meet them. In some cases, smaller businesses may have been passed over for loans, especially as the fund began to run out.

 

The second round has corrected many of those problems. Larger businesses are less eligible, meaning small businesses have a better chance at approval. And a portion of second round funding was given to smaller local banks, in order to make it more accessible to small businesses.

PPP MYTH #3: All the funds are gone

This is 100% false. The mad rush of PPP’s early days are over, and there’s plenty of funding to go around. PPP still has $150 billion available across both rounds of funding. So take your time to fill out a good application, include all necessary documents, and apply.

PPP MYTH #4: If you don’t have payroll you aren’t eligible

You do not need payroll in order to qualify for PPP. If you’re a self-employed sole proprietor or partnership member, you can still qualify for PPP.

 

The term “Paycheck Protection Program” is misleading, in this case. You don’t need to write paychecks to get covered.

 

When you apply, your loan amount—and forgiveness—will be based on your 2019 net income, as reported on Schedule C of your tax return.

PPP MYTH #5: PPP does not apply to contractors

Companies cannot pay you, a contractor, using their PPP funds. However, you can still get PPP funding.

 

Here’s why. Early on, companies were allowed to use PPP funding to pay contractors. That changed during the first round, and now they can use it only to pay employees.

 

There’s a reason for that: You qualify for your own PPP. If you’re self-employed, then the government automatically considers you a sole proprietorship. So you can apply for PPP funding for your business.

 

Your loan amount, and forgiveness, well be based on your prior income as reported on 1099-MISC forms.

PPP MYTH #6: Forgiveness won’t apply to my business

Even if you don’t qualify to have all your loan forgiven, you may get a portion of it covered.

 

PPP forgiveness isn’t a binary—forgiven vs. unforgiven. It’s a sliding scale. It’s worth applying, because that portion you do have forgiven is still a great resource—essentially, a tax free grant from the government.

 

The portion you have to pay back isn’t expensive, either. Interest is set at 1% over two years, with the first six months deferred. It’s still an incredibly cheap small business loan.

 

PPP MYTH #7: PPP could harm my credit or trigger an audit

PPP does not require a credit check, so applying won’t harm your score.

 

Also, while the rules may eventually change, for now the government is saying they won’t audit anyone who gets a PPP loan of less than $2 million.

PPP MYTH #8: If you get EIDL, you can’t get PPP

You can receive both the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and PPP. In fact, the two are designed to be used together.

 

If you’ve already received EIDL, you need to report the amount when you apply for PPP. This will affect how much you’re qualified for, and how much you’re forgiven.

 

Don’t let having one loan influence your decision to apply for another, other than being sure to accurately report the amounts when you do apply.

 

One more guideline: Be organized about how you use EIDL and PPP. Use each to cover the expenses they’re designed for. For instance, don’t use EIDL to cover payroll when you could use PPP instead.

Expertly prepared books will increase your chances of receiving PPP funding and forgiveness. Connect with the pros at Bench who can help you get your books taken care of, so you can take back control of your business.

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Magic Johnson’s Company Helps Fund $100 Million To Small Businesses

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Magic Johnson‘s life insurance company, EquiTrust Life Insurance Co., is helping small businesses owned by women and minority groups secure upwards of $100 million in Paycheck Protection Program loans.

The work Johnson’s company is doing is through the Small Business Administration PPP program and is in partnership with MBE Capital Partners.

“We knew why the money was gone and couldn’t trickle down to small businesses, especially small minority businesses, because they didn’t have those great relationships with the banks,” Johnson told the Wall Street Journal. “So this was easy for us to understand.

“This is, when you think about it, life and death for so many business owners. They have nowhere else to turn.”

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Chuck E Cheeses Changes Its Name to Attract More Take Out Business

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Things are changing during this international pandemic, and so is the name of a popular childhood hangout. Chuck E. Cheese is now doing business as Pasqually’s Pizza & Wings — with an entirely redesigned and distinctly mouse-less logo.

The change was first reported in Food & Wine in April, when a woman from Philadelphia shared how she felt duped by the CEC Entertainment brand when she ordered pizza from Pasqually’s using GrubHub, with the false impression that she was ordering from a local business.

In a statement to Food & Wine, the company confirmed the association and clarified that this would not be the end for Chuck.

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